Woodruff Utah contract attorney

 

Woodruff Utah

General Counsel

 

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Attorney for contracts and business

Should I Have a Lawyer Review My Employment Contract Before Signing?

A promising company has just offered you employment. You are happy with the numbers and ready to sign the contract.

Even though everything feels right, it is still in your best interest to have a contract review lawyer examine the contract before you sign on the dotted line.

In fact, there are a lot of reasons why you want a contract lawyer to review your employment contract before signing it:

Job Security: Are you getting any sort of job security with this contract? This is a question only a lawyer can answer for you. Compensation and Benefits: A lawyer will make sure you understand what compensation and benefits are being offered through the contract with this job. Termination: This one is important. You want to make sure the contract doesn’t give the employer too much flexibility with how or why you can be terminated. The contract should ensure you must be terminated with just cause. A contract lawyer is also going to look for non-compete clauses, moonlighting clauses, and invention clauses.

You really need to know whether or not you can get another job in the same industry if you lose this job. You also need to know if your ideas and inventions are yours – or if they belong to the company.

How Much Does a Contract Lawyer Cost to Review My Contract?

Here you are – looking at a contract you drafted based on an outline you found on the internet.

You think it looks alright, but you also wonder if you should have a lawyer look at the contact. Then, you ask yourself, “How much is it going to cost to have a lawyer review my contract?”

Unfortunately, the answer to this question is the same as any other type of lawyer service you could need: it depends.

Some lawyers like to charge an hourly rate while others prefer a flat-rate basis. For some, the price varies with the contract.

Typically, hiring a lawyer to review a contract will always be cheaper than hiring a lawyer to draft a contract. A contract lawyer may offer a flat-rate based on how long the contract is or how fast you need the contract reviewed.

How to Find a Contract Lawyer to Review My Contract?

Finding a reputable contract lawyer to adequately and efficiently review your contract is not always an easy task. Unfortunately, just doing a quick search on Google is just going to bury you under advertisements of lots of different options.

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Fruitland Utah lawyer for business lawsuits

 

Fruitland Utah

I Own a Small Business, Do I Need a Business Lawyer?

 

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Most states require that an entity doing business within their borders designate and maintain a Registered Agent. The Registered Agent can be an individual or company hired to receive Service of Process on behalf of the business. However, not all entities are registered in all states, not all are active and some do business under as many as 40 plus entity names. It is the lawyer's responsibility to find out which entity name they are serving and who the Registered Agent is. If the information is wrong, the lawsuit will be delayed. To find the necessary information, the attorney's staff should be intimately familiar with Secretary of State websites.Each Secretary of State website lists an entity as either "Active" or "Inactive." "Active" means the entity is in good standing and has paid their yearly fee while "Inactive" means they have not, In fact, "Inactive" may indicate that the entity is no longer in business or meet the qualification so the Five-year rule.The most perplexing error may be in determining which entity name is the correct one. For example, an entity may be doing business under both Talbott, Inc. and Talbott, Corp. If a lawsuit is submitted just to "Talbott," it will be returned.The larger Registered Agent companies have offices in nearly every state. They collectively receive thousands of lawsuits a week that generate huge piles of work. Of those, several hundred are returned at the Registered Agent's expense for various reasons. Attorney's who repeatedly make the same errors soon stand out in the Service of Process Specialist's mind and their lawsuits often go to the bottom of the pile. There is no time limit on returns, the Registered Agent makes no money and it may be as much at a week or two before the returns are written up and sent out.The answer is simple. A well informed staff that understands the Registered Agent process can virtually eliminate these and many other costly mistakes.

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Eden Utah general counsel

 

Eden Utah

When is a Business Lawyer Needed?

 

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Among the countless worries for entrepreneurs who are starting or are already running a small business is the question of whether they need a business lawyer. The perception is that attorneys charge high rates and many small businesses don't have much, if any, extra capital with which to pay lawyers. As a result, most small business owners only hire an attorney experienced with business matters when confronted with a serious legal problem (e.g., you're sued by a customer). However, legal help is a cost of doing business that often saves you money and helps your business in the long run. While you certainly don't need an attorney for every step of running your business, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of the cure. This article will explain when you can cover legal issues on your own or with minimal attorney assistance and when you will definitely need a business lawyer. Issues You Can Handle on Your Own There are certain matters that are fairly straightforward and/or not unduly difficult to learn and therefore do not require the services of an attorney who charges at least $200 per hour. There are enough expenses associated with running a business, why not save yourself a load of money and do it yourself if you can? The following is a list of some tasks that business owners should consider taking on themselves (with the aid of self-help resources, online and in print): Writing a business plan Researching and picking a name for your business (previously trademarked business names can be researched online) Reserving a domain name for your website Creating a legal partnership agreement, limited liability company (LLC) operating agreement, or shareholder's agreement (see Choosing a Legal Structure) Applying for an employer identification number (EIN), which you will need for employee tax purposes Applying for any licenses and permits the business requires Interviewing and hiring employees (there are federal and state anti-discrimination laws which regulate the hiring of employees) Submitting necessary IRS forms Documenting LLC meetings Hiring independent contractors and contracting with vendors Creating contracts for use with customers or clients Creating a buy-sell agreement with partners Updating any partnership, LLC, or shareholder's agreements under which you are currently operating Handling audits initiated by the IRS The above is not an exhaustive list of legal tasks which small business owners can do on their own. It should be stated that if your business is well-funded or you feel that you need the assistance of an attorney, you can always retain a lawyer to help you with everything listed above.

Issues Where You Will Need a Business Lawyer

Most of the issues outlined above can be handled by any intelligent business owner (if you can run a business, you can certainly fill out IRS forms or fill in boilerplate business forms). There are times, however, when a business faces issues that are too complex, too time consuming, or fraught with liability issues. At that point,the wisest move is to retain a business lawyer.

A few examples include:

Former, current, or prospective employees suing on the grounds of discrimination in hiring, firing, or hostile work environment Local, state, or federal government entities filing complaints or investigating your business for violation of any laws. You want to make a "special allocation" of profits and losses or you want to contribute appreciated property to your partnership or LLC agreement An environmental issue arises and your business is involved (even if your business didn't cause the environmental problem, you may be penalized) Negotiating for the sale or your company or for the acquisition of another company or its assets

An Ounce of Prevention

While you certainly need to retain an attorney for the serious issues above, your emphasis should be placed on preventing such occurrences in the first place. Prevention does not necessarily involve hiring an attorney, though consulting with one wouldn't hurt. By the time you or your business is sued, the preventable damage has been done and the only question that remains is how much you'll be paying in attorney's fees, court fees, and damages.

For example, by the time a prospective employee files a lawsuit claiming gender discrimination based in part upon questions posed at the job interview, all you can do is hire an attorney to defend the lawsuit. If, on the other hand, you had done your own research on anti-discrimination laws, or you had consulted an attorney beforehand, you would have known not to inquire as to whether the applicant was pregnant or planned on becoming pregnant. The small effort at the beginning of the process would save you an enormous headache later.

To prevent unnecessary attorney costs at the inception of your business as well as tremendous costs after a lawsuit has been filed, you might consider a consultation arrangement with an attorney. Such an arrangement would entail you doing most of the legwork of research and the attorney providing legal review or guidance.

For example, you might use self help and online sources to create a contract with a vendor and ask an attorney to simply review and offer suggestions. Or from the previous example, you might research types of questions to ask during an interview and then send the list to an attorney for his or her approval. This way, you prevent the potential headache later and the cost to you is minimal because you've already done most of the work and the attorney simply reviews the document.

Free Case Review for Your Business Needs Call 1-800-564-2707 today.

You won't need a lawyer for each and every legal issue that comes up in your business. But when you do, it's good to know where to find the right one. FindLaw can put you in touch with a small business attorney in your area to help answer your questions. Learn more with a free case review.

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Willard Utah small business law

 

Willard Utah

The Most Common Mistake Lawyers Make When Sending a Lawsuit to a Registered Agent

 

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Should I Get An S Corporation?

S-Corporation

An S corporation is a special type of corporation created through an IRS tax election which we will discuss shortly. An eligible domestic corporation can avoid double taxation by electing to be treated as an S corporation.

To be considered an S corp, you must first form a business as a C-corporation in the state where it is headquartered. S corporations are "considered by law to be a unique entity, separate and apart from those who own it."

This limits the financial liability for which you (the owner, or "shareholder") are responsible. Nevertheless, liability protection is limited - which means that S corps do not necessarily shield you from all litigation such as an employee’s tort actions as a result of a workplace incident.

What makes the S corp different from a traditional c-corporation is that profits and losses can pass through to your personal tax return. Consequently, the business is not taxed itself. Only the shareholders are taxed. There is an important factor.

However, any shareholder who works for the company must pay him or herself "reasonable compensation." Basically, the shareholder must be paid fair market value, or the IRS might reclassify any additional corporate earnings as "wages."

Advantages of S-Corporation

Tax Savings - only the wages of the shareholder who is an employee is subject to employment tax. One of the best features of the S Corp is the tax savings for you and your business. While members of an LLC are subject to employment tax on the entire net income of the business, only the wages of the S Corp shareholder who is an employee are subject to employment tax. The remaining income is paid to the owner as a "distribution," which is taxed at a lower rate, if at all.

Business Expense Tax Credits - Some expenses that shareholder/employees incur can be written off as business expenses. Nevertheless, if such an employee owns 2% or more shares, then benefits like health and life insurance are deemed taxable income.

Independent Life - An S corp designation also allows a business to have an independent life, separate from its shareholders. If a shareholder leaves the company, or sells his or her shares, the S corp can continue doing business relatively undisturbed. Maintaining the business as a distinct corporate entity defines clear lines between the shareholders and the business that improve the protection of the shareholders.

Shareholders are typically not personally responsible for business debts and liabilities

Unlimited life extending beyond owner illness or death

Additional capital can be raised by selling shares of the corporation’s stock.

Pass-through taxation.

Remember - you must file a form 2553 with the IRS within the timeframe or you won't have an S corporation!

Disadvantages of S-Corporation

There are IRS imposes restrictions on S corporation shareholders:

Be a domestic corporation

Less than 100 shareholders

Be Individuals, certain trusts and estates

Cannot be non-resident aliens

Have only one class of stock

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Eureka Utah business lawyer consultation

 

Eureka Utah

Securities Lawyer and Reg D Attorney

 

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In today's society, many people are starting new businesses and they need to legally register their company. If a business is not registered, the owners may be breaking the law as they would be accused of running the business illegally. When a company wants to merge with another firm, they should have a written contract which both parties need to sign. These agreements should be drafted by a business lawyer who should guide the firms during the process. Business law covers a wide branch of knowledge across a variety of disciplines.Business law covers all aspects of trade from the registration of a business to hiring employees and selling goods across the globe. A business may need a lawyer to help with the relevant terms of agreement and sales and present them to the other parties. When a company wants to bid for tender or have a project, the lawyer needs to come up with various proposals to present to the other parties. At times, disputes arise and when there was no binding agreement, the business suffers a huge loss.There are some companies that do not keep in mind the terms and codes of trade especially within their intentional market. Failing to comply with the law is a serious offense and the company may end up folding as a result. A company should look to hire a lawyer who is aware of the business laws set by the Department of Trade and the lawyer ought to find out how the company performs in their industry without bypassing federal laws.Business law also covers the partnership aspect of the company. At times, the companies who want to merge but they may still want to maintain their rights and recognition within their market. A good contract should be put in place and both parties should agree to work within the laid down rules and regulations in the contract. Many partnerships have landed in court simply because some codes were not met or the other party had more benefits than the other party did. Some aspects like profits, shares, and investments need to be addressed fully before signing a partnership agreement.Before someone starts any business, they need to know the codes, laws, and terms of reference. Business law applies to all types of businesses whether it is a corporation, a sole proprietorship, or a company. The law requires that all companies and businesses need to be registered and trade within the law. When someone trades in illegal goods, they are required by the law to stand trial. The codes of trade need to be enforced fully and that every businessman understands what they mean. Business law terms are difficult to understand hence there is sometimes a need to hire a lawyer to interpret the message and ensure that the client know what each business documents entail. At times, some businesses may want to trade with other companies and need advice from their lawyers and other business professionals on the proposed plan. Business law can also cover issues such as privacy, copyright and issues involving tax.All in all, business law ensures that a company practices in the correct way and that the business runs smoothly and that all the parties involved in the various commerce sectors understand the codes of operation.

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Mona Utah business law office

 

Mona Utah

I Own a Small Business, Do I Need a Business Lawyer?

 

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The "C" Corporation

C-Corporation

A corporation is the most common business structure. A corporation is an independent legal entity owned by its shareholders.

This means that the corporation itself, not the shareholders that own it, is held legally liable for the actions and debts the business incurs.

Corporations are more complex than other business structures because they tend to have costly administrative fees and complex tax and legal requirements. Because of these issues, corporations are generally suggested for established, larger companies with multiple employees.

For businesses in that position, corporations offer the ability to sell ownership shares in the business through stock offerings. “Going public” through an initial public offering (IPO) is a major selling point in attracting investment capital and high quality employees.

A corporation’s shareholders, directors, and officers must observe particular formalities in a corporation’s operation and administration.

For example, management decisions must often be made by formal vote and recorded in corporate minutes. Director and shareholder meetings must be properly noticed and documented.

Finally, corporations must meet annual reporting requirements and pay ongoing fees in their state of incorporation and in states where they are registered to transact business.

Taxation is a significant consideration when choosing a business type, and a C corporation is taxed as a separate legal entity (which means no pass-through taxation like a partnership). A business tax return is filed and taxes are paid on the corporation’s profits.

If the corporation distributes profits to the shareholders in the form of dividends, shareholders pay income tax on those distributions. This creates a double taxation of corporate profits.

As with any business type that offers liability protection to owners, a corporation must be created at the state level. Articles of Incorporation (sometimes called a Certificate of Incorporation) in the appropriate state must be filed and filing fees paid.

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Huntsville Utah corporate counsel

 

Huntsville Utah

Lawyer for Contract Review

 

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Do I Need a Business Lawyer?

As a business owner, you face many decisions when it comes to starting, running, and growing your business.

This article is designed to explain your options and help you decide the correct business type for your business. business-types

It explains the advantages and disadvantages of the main business types, including Sole Proprietorship, Partnership, Limited Liability Company, C Corporation, as well as S Corporation.

After I clearly explain each business type in detail and go over the advantages and disadvantages of each, I will explain how you can form your own entity so you can get started with your business and help protect yourself from liability.

Thank you for going on this journey with me. If you have any questions whatsoever, I encourage you to post questions down below in the comment section.

Sole Proprietorship

The sole proprietorship is the simplest business form and is not a legal entity. Sole proprietorship is the easiest type of business to establish which means that there’s no state filing required.

It is simply an enterprise owned and operated by an individual. By default, once you start selling goods or services, you have created a sole proprietorship.

So there’s no actual filing requirements and you simply report your business’s earnings on your personal taxes.

sole proprietorship is not legally separate from its owner and it offers no personal liability protection. The law does not distinguish between the owner’s personal assets and the business’s obligations.

In fact, a sole proprietor’s assets can be and often are used to satisfy the debts and liabilities of the business. In other words, if your business gets sued, your personal assets (such as your house, car, or any other properties you own) may also be in risk.

Accidents happen, and businesses end all the time. Such circumstances may quickly become a nightmare for a business owner who operates as a sole proprietor.

A sole proprietorship can operate under the name of its owner or it can do business under a fictitious name, such as Benjamin's Hair Shop. The fictitious name is simply a trade name--it does not create a legal entity separate from the sole proprietor owner.

The sole proprietorship is a popular business form due to its simplicity, ease of setup, and nominal cost. A sole proprietor need only register his or her name and secure local licenses, and the sole proprietor is ready for business.

The owner of a sole proprietorship typically signs contracts in his or her own name, because the sole proprietorship has no separate identity under the law. The sole proprietor owner will typically have customers write checks in the owner's name, even if the business uses a fictitious name. Sole proprietor owners can, and often do, commingle personal and business property and funds, something that partnerships, LLCs and corporations cannot do.

Sole proprietorships often have their bank accounts in the name of the owner. Sole proprietors need not observe formalities such as voting and meetings associated with the more complex business forms.

Sole proprietorships can bring lawsuits (and can be sued) using the name of the sole proprietor owner. Many businesses begin as sole proprietorships and graduate to more complex business forms as the business develops.

Because a sole proprietorship is indistinguishable from its owner, sole proprietorship taxation is actually easy. The income earned by a sole proprietorship is income earned by its owner.

A sole proprietor reports the sole proprietorship income and losses and expenses by filling out and filing a Schedule C, along with the standard Form 1040. Your profits and losses are first recorded on a tax form called Schedule C, which is filed along with your 1040. Then the "bottom-line amount" from Schedule C is transferred to your personal tax return.

This aspect is attractive because business losses you suffer may offset income earned from other sources.

As a sole proprietor, you must also file an IRS tax Schedule SE with Form 1040. You use Schedule SE to calculate how much self-employment tax you owe. You need not pay unemployment tax on yourself, although you must pay unemployment tax on any employees of the business. Of course, you won't enjoy unemployment benefits should the business suffer.

Advantages of Sole Proprietorship

Instant, easy & inexpensive No state paperwork is required for creation No separate tax filing is required -- profits or losses are reported on the owner’s tax return The owner may freely mix business and personal assets A sole proprietor need not pay unemployment tax on himself or herself (but must pay employee unemployment tax) Few, if any, ongoing formalities

Disadvantages of Sole Proprietorship The owner is subject to unlimited personal liability for business debts, losses and liabilities Obtaining capital, such as a bank loan, can be more difficult -- lenders often require a more formal entity structure Sole proprietorships rarely survive an owner’s death or incapacity, so they do not retain value Sole proprietorships by definition can only have one owner A distinct disadvantage, however, is that the owner of a sole proprietorship remains personally liable for all the business's debts.

So, if a sole proprietor business runs into financial trouble, creditors can bring lawsuits against the business owner. If such suits are successful, the owner will have to pay the business debts with his or her own money.

Let's examine this more closely because the potential liability can be alarming. Assume that a sole proprietor borrows money to operate but the business loses its major customer, goes out of business, and is unable to repay the loan. The sole proprietor is liable for the amount of the loan, which can potentially consume all her personal assets.

Imagine an even worse scenario: The sole proprietor is involved in a business-related accident in which someone is injured or killed. The resulting negligence case can be brought against the sole proprietor owner and against her personal assets, such as her bank account, her retirement accounts, and even her home.

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Elberta Utah business lawyer near me

 

Elberta Utah

I Own a Small Business, Do I Need a Business Lawyer?

 

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When to Hire a Business Lawyer

There are two professionals every business will need early on: an accountant and a lawyer. The reasons for hiring an accountant are pretty obvious--you need someone to help you set up your "chart of accounts," review your numbers periodically, and prepare all of your necessary federal, state and local tax returns. The reason for hiring a business attorney may not, however, be so apparent. A good business attorney will provide vital assistance in almost every aspect of your business, from basic zoning compliance and copyright and trademark advice to formal business incorporation and lawsuits and liability. First, some general rules about dealing with lawyers:

If you are being sued, it's too late. Most small businesses put off hiring a lawyer until the sheriff is standing at the door serving them with a summons. Bad mistake. The time to hook up with a good business lawyer is before you are sued. Once you have been served with a summons and complaint, it's too late--the problem has already occurred, and it's just a question of how much you will have to pay (in court costs, attorneys' fees, settlements and other expenses) to get the problem resolved. America's judicial system is a lot like a Roach Motel--it's easy to get into court, but very difficult to get out once you've been "trapped." Most lawyers agree that while nobody likes to pay attorneys' fees for anything (heck, let's let our hair down--nobody likes paying or dealing with lawyers, period), but the fee a lawyer will charge to keep you out of trouble is only a small fraction of the fee a lawyer will charge to get you out of trouble once it's happened.

Big firm or small firm? Generally speaking, the larger the law firm, the greater the overhead, therefore the higher the hourly rates you will be expected to pay. Still, larger firms have a number of advantages over smaller ones. Over the past 20 years, lawyers have become incredibly specialized. If you use a solo practitioner or small firm as your lawyer(s), it's likely that they will not have all the skills you may need to grow your business. I don't know of any solo practitioner, and very few small firms (under 10 lawyers) that could handle your lawsuits, negotiate your lease of office or retail space, file a patent or trademark, draft a software license agreement, advise you on terminating a disruptive employee, and oversee your corporate annual meeting. Sooner or later, these "generalists" will have to refer you out to specialists, and you will find yourself dealing with two or three (or even more) attorneys. While larger firms are more expensive to deal with, they have two significant advantages: 1) they usually have all the legal skills you need "under one roof," and 2) they have a lot of clout in the local, regional and (perhaps) national legal community. A nasty letter from a "powerhouse" law firm with offices in 30 states is a lot more intimidating than a nasty letter from a solo practitioner who is not admitted to practice in the defendant's state. Also, being connected with a large, well-established law firm may have intangible benefits--they may be willing to introduce you to financing sources or use their name as a reference when seeking partnership arrangements. Certainly if you run a fast-growing entrepreneurial company that plans to go public (or sell out to a big company) some day, you would need to work with lawyers whose names are recognized in the investment banking and venture capital communities.

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Dugway Utah business lawyers

 

Dugway Utah

Business Lawyer

 

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Are you starting a business? Hiring or firing top-level employees? Signing a deal or contract?Buying or merging with another company?When do you exactly need a business attorney?Before hiring a business attorney, you might want to ask your prospect these questions:o How long he has been practicing law?o What is his area of specialty?o Has he represented a similar company before?o Who are the other lawyers and paralegal who will work with him in the firm?o How much are the legal fees and the expenses that will be charged?o Are the sample legal forms, agreements and policies that you can see?o How many corporations has he incorporated?o Has he any experience in handling employment matters?o Has he any experience in dealing with tax issues?o Has he any business advice to keep you safe from lawsuits?When serious legal problems arise, you will need the skills and experience of a business lawyer. Here are a few situations when the services of a business lawyer are needed:o In special allocation meeting - This is the time when you and your business partner decide to set aside profits and losses in your partnership agreemento When either one of you in the partnership wants to donate or contribute an appreciated property to the partnershipo When an employee or former associate threatens to sue your companyIn addition, when business is running, you will need the services of a lawyer to do the following tasks:o Prepare written agreements for hiring of contractors and consultantso Create documents for clients and customerso Document business meetings and actionso Call and hold corporate meetings, and prepare its minuteso Draft buy-sell agreements with business partnerso Update and make necessary changes in business agreementso Handle tax auditGenerally, what a business attorney can do is protect your business from resource-draining lawsuits and litigation. A lawyer can always offer measures to avoid the potential danger of frivolous lawsuits. Here is some of it:o Protect personal assets by separating personal property from business assetso Give attention to details such posting of warning signs and labels on productso Post store policies in public areas such as dressing rooms, in company literature on the website and even in store receiptso Ensure potential hazards are cleared which include posting of warning signs to avoid accidentso Make a record of customer phone requests, suggestions and complaintso Attend to customer needso Supervise staff training on policies and guidelineso Make insurance coverage for the company against accidents, injuries, theft, and liability.Business attorneys are vital to business and finding the one who will truly represent your company is never easy. After selecting the lawyer that you need, the next thing to do is to find out information about his background and experience.Former colleagues and clients can provide you with a wealth of information about a lawyer's background and credentials. You can also check his membership in the state bar association to confirm his legal personality.For more information about the most relevant business law applicable to your particular case, request the guidance of business law attorneys services.

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Goshen Utah commerical law attorney

 

Goshen Utah

Business Attorney

 

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Most states require that an entity doing business within their borders designate and maintain a Registered Agent. The Registered Agent can be an individual or company hired to receive Service of Process on behalf of the business. However, not all entities are registered in all states, not all are active and some do business under as many as 40 plus entity names. It is the lawyer's responsibility to find out which entity name they are serving and who the Registered Agent is. If the information is wrong, the lawsuit will be delayed. To find the necessary information, the attorney's staff should be intimately familiar with Secretary of State websites.Each Secretary of State website lists an entity as either "Active" or "Inactive." "Active" means the entity is in good standing and has paid their yearly fee while "Inactive" means they have not, In fact, "Inactive" may indicate that the entity is no longer in business or meet the qualification so the Five-year rule.The most perplexing error may be in determining which entity name is the correct one. For example, an entity may be doing business under both Talbott, Inc. and Talbott, Corp. If a lawsuit is submitted just to "Talbott," it will be returned.The larger Registered Agent companies have offices in nearly every state. They collectively receive thousands of lawsuits a week that generate huge piles of work. Of those, several hundred are returned at the Registered Agent's expense for various reasons. Attorney's who repeatedly make the same errors soon stand out in the Service of Process Specialist's mind and their lawsuits often go to the bottom of the pile. There is no time limit on returns, the Registered Agent makes no money and it may be as much at a week or two before the returns are written up and sent out.The answer is simple. A well informed staff that understands the Registered Agent process can virtually eliminate these and many other costly mistakes.

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