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Woodruff Utah

Corporate Counsel

 

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What Does A Small Business Lawyer Do

A small business lawyer works with individuals who own small businesses. The lawyer may help them form their business and incorporate their company when they’re just getting starting.

Later, the business owner may turn to the lawyer to help with employment issues and understanding laws and policies that pertain to their business.

The truth is, a small business lawyer can handle anything that the small business owner would need in terms of the law, business formation, hiring and firing employees, lawsuits, and much more.

What Makes A Good Business Lawyer

A good business lawyer is someone who is experienced and knowledgeable in their field. They’ve worked with many businesses and entrepreneurs and have created a smooth process to help business owners get just what they need.

We are a good and reputable business lawyer because we truly care about our clients. We put you first and are here to answer any questions you may have along the way. We’ve worked with countless business owners and entrepreneurs and always deliver on what we promise.

What To Ask A Business Lawyer

When you are meeting your business lawyer the first time, you may have some questions for them. Some of them may include:

Are you licensed to practice law? How many years have you been practicing law? What results do you get for your clients? Do you have any personal recommendations I can check on? What can I expect when working with you? Do you have any hidden fees I should know about? What’s the timeline for this? After your initial consultation, you may have some other questions as you continue to make decisions about your business.

Some of these may be what type of business entity should I choose (LLC or S-Corp), what’s the advantages of each, and how do I make my business compliant with all laws?

Your specific questions will change as you move forward in the process, depending on what you’re getting help for. It’s best to write down any questions you have when you think of them and then ask your lawyer the next time you meet.

When Would I Use A Business Lawyer

You may hire a business lawyer when you’re forming your business and trying to decide how you should incorporate it. You may want a business lawyer to help you file all the necessary documentation and make sure that you’re compliant with all laws once you start your business.

Once your business has launched, you may want a business lawyer to help you create contracts for employees and any other hiring you may need to do. You’ll likely want a business lawyer to help you should you have the need to defend against a lawsuit or present one yourself.

There are so many reasons why you may need to use a business lawyer because a business lawyer has a wide range of skills and knowledge to help you in your day-to-day business operations as well as the unexpected.

If you’re questioning whether your issue needs the help of a business lawyer, call us at our Law Office for a free consultation. We will give you an honest assessment of your situation and help you determine the next steps to take. Simply dial 1-800-564-2707 today to get started.

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Fruitland Utah lawyer for business lawsuits

 

Fruitland Utah

What Is Business Law?

 

litigation attorney

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In one of his most famous and tautological quotes, President Warring G. Harding once observed that, "The business of America is business." He was right. No nation on earth has a stronger commitment to free enterprise than the United States. According to the Small Business Administration (SBA), there are nearly 30 million small companies in the U.S., which represents over 99 percent of all employer firms.Although it is invariably the corporations that make headlines when accused of wrongdoing, most business-related lawsuits are filed against small companies since there are so many of them. This specialized area of practice is called business litigation in the legal profession. Lawsuits that involve malpractice, contract law, and class action suits are the most common types of these cases.Who To CallEven though the law is supposed to be blind, companies of all sizes are often cast as villains when accused of wrongdoing. Whether the case is about food poisoning or a defective airbag, a firm must work fast to defend the company's good name. Failure to do so will almost inevitably result in a deluge of bad press, which will almost certainly hurt the bottom line.In any civil case, the complainant is the accuser, while the litigant is the accused, hence the term "business litigation." These accusers could be anyone, including a current or former employee, customer, client, or former partner. The most sophisticated cases litigation lawyers handle are class action suits.A lawyer that specializes in class action lawsuits must defend his client against a group of complainants that may include hundreds or even thousands of people. The outcome of these cases can alter the fortunes of any company, no matter how large they might be. The Master Tobacco Settlement, for example, was settled in 1998 for $206 billion over 25 years!What To ExpectWhether of the class action, contract, or malpractice variety, most of these cases are settled before they ever get to court. There are many reasons for this. First and most obviously, members of the firm that may or may not be responsible for any wrongdoing do not want their name tarnished in the press. As a result, they are often willing to settle cases they may not have been responsible for simply because it is cheaper and easier than going to trial. With that said, a good business litigation lawyer must be a skilled mediator, since that is often how these cases are resolved.Mediation Vs. ArbitrationAs a general rule, attorneys must negotiate in either arbitration or mediation hearings. The only difference between the two processes is that arbitration involves a legal judgment that is determined by an arbitration board, while mediation is simply an open negotiation between the two opposing sides.Settlements that are made in mediation often involve disputes where the complainant believes that they were unlawfully terminated. Because wrongful termination cases are so common, they seldom make the papers or the news, which is why they are often settled for a reasonable sum before they ever get to a judge.In any of the aforementioned situations, an experienced business lawyer may mean the difference between a crippling lawsuit and a legal victory.

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Eden Utah general counsel

 

Eden Utah

Top Rated Business Lawyer

 

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I get asked this question all of the time. Mainly, this question comes from people I run into that own and operate a small business and have always done things for themselves. The business may have a few employees, own some assets and is quite profitable. When speaking with them, I always hear "I don't really have any legal problems so why do I need a lawyer? Business is good and my employees love me." Well, when I hear this, I know what I am getting into.The first thing I ask these people is: how is your business structured? LLC? Corporation? Once we determine that answer, the next questions become: Do you have an operating agreement if you are an LLC or by-laws if you are a corporation? Do you have annual meeting minutes? Seven out of ten times people respond "no" to these questions. This is why they need a business lawyer. If they are not following corporate formalities and organizational protocols and someone would sue the company, the chance of that plaintiff piercing the corporate veil and attacking the owner's personal assets increases exponentially.Another question I ask is: do you have written contracts for the work you perform and the business dealing you are involved in? About 4 out of 10 say no. Again, this is why they need a business lawyer. The handshake agreement doesn't work in today's society. Everything should be in writing, not because you can trust no one, it is because you need to protect your rights. If they don't have contracts they use or have written them themselves, you can bet that they will spend insane amounts of money to settle disputes that could have been prevented by working with a business lawyer from the start.Lastly, I usually ask them if they understand the various federal and state employment laws that govern the employer-employee relationship. Most respond with "Pennsylvania is an employee at will state and I can fire anyone at anytime." This is what I call a ticking time bomb. Yes, it is true that Pennsylvania recognizes employment at will; however, there are various laws that give employees protection from discrimination, unfair treatment, unfair wages, etc. Most of the time these business owners have no idea what they don't know and end up doing something that costs them ten of thousands of dollars to settle. This is why they need a business lawyer.So as you can see, there are many reasons to work with a business lawyer when you own a business from the start. People improperly assume that the only time they will need a lawyer is in the event that they get sued. However, a good business lawyer will help you run your business in a way that limits the reasons for which you could be sued at a fraction of the cost it will take to litigate and resolve a dispute down the road.

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Willard Utah small business law

 

Willard Utah

Lawyer for Contract Review

 

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Among the countless worries for entrepreneurs who are starting or are already running a small business is the question of whether they need a business lawyer. The perception is that attorneys charge high rates and many small businesses don't have much, if any, extra capital with which to pay lawyers. As a result, most small business owners only hire an attorney experienced with business matters when confronted with a serious legal problem (e.g., you're sued by a customer). However, legal help is a cost of doing business that often saves you money and helps your business in the long run. While you certainly don't need an attorney for every step of running your business, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of the cure. This article will explain when you can cover legal issues on your own or with minimal attorney assistance and when you will definitely need a business lawyer. Issues You Can Handle on Your Own There are certain matters that are fairly straightforward and/or not unduly difficult to learn and therefore do not require the services of an attorney who charges at least $200 per hour. There are enough expenses associated with running a business, why not save yourself a load of money and do it yourself if you can? The following is a list of some tasks that business owners should consider taking on themselves (with the aid of self-help resources, online and in print): Writing a business plan Researching and picking a name for your business (previously trademarked business names can be researched online) Reserving a domain name for your website Creating a legal partnership agreement, limited liability company (LLC) operating agreement, or shareholder's agreement (see Choosing a Legal Structure) Applying for an employer identification number (EIN), which you will need for employee tax purposes Applying for any licenses and permits the business requires Interviewing and hiring employees (there are federal and state anti-discrimination laws which regulate the hiring of employees) Submitting necessary IRS forms Documenting LLC meetings Hiring independent contractors and contracting with vendors Creating contracts for use with customers or clients Creating a buy-sell agreement with partners Updating any partnership, LLC, or shareholder's agreements under which you are currently operating Handling audits initiated by the IRS The above is not an exhaustive list of legal tasks which small business owners can do on their own. It should be stated that if your business is well-funded or you feel that you need the assistance of an attorney, you can always retain a lawyer to help you with everything listed above.

Issues Where You Will Need a Business Lawyer

Most of the issues outlined above can be handled by any intelligent business owner (if you can run a business, you can certainly fill out IRS forms or fill in boilerplate business forms). There are times, however, when a business faces issues that are too complex, too time consuming, or fraught with liability issues. At that point,the wisest move is to retain a business lawyer.

A few examples include:

Former, current, or prospective employees suing on the grounds of discrimination in hiring, firing, or hostile work environment Local, state, or federal government entities filing complaints or investigating your business for violation of any laws. You want to make a "special allocation" of profits and losses or you want to contribute appreciated property to your partnership or LLC agreement An environmental issue arises and your business is involved (even if your business didn't cause the environmental problem, you may be penalized) Negotiating for the sale or your company or for the acquisition of another company or its assets

An Ounce of Prevention

While you certainly need to retain an attorney for the serious issues above, your emphasis should be placed on preventing such occurrences in the first place. Prevention does not necessarily involve hiring an attorney, though consulting with one wouldn't hurt. By the time you or your business is sued, the preventable damage has been done and the only question that remains is how much you'll be paying in attorney's fees, court fees, and damages.

For example, by the time a prospective employee files a lawsuit claiming gender discrimination based in part upon questions posed at the job interview, all you can do is hire an attorney to defend the lawsuit. If, on the other hand, you had done your own research on anti-discrimination laws, or you had consulted an attorney beforehand, you would have known not to inquire as to whether the applicant was pregnant or planned on becoming pregnant. The small effort at the beginning of the process would save you an enormous headache later.

To prevent unnecessary attorney costs at the inception of your business as well as tremendous costs after a lawsuit has been filed, you might consider a consultation arrangement with an attorney. Such an arrangement would entail you doing most of the legwork of research and the attorney providing legal review or guidance.

For example, you might use self help and online sources to create a contract with a vendor and ask an attorney to simply review and offer suggestions. Or from the previous example, you might research types of questions to ask during an interview and then send the list to an attorney for his or her approval. This way, you prevent the potential headache later and the cost to you is minimal because you've already done most of the work and the attorney simply reviews the document.

Free Case Review for Your Business Needs Call 1-800-564-2707 today.

You won't need a lawyer for each and every legal issue that comes up in your business. But when you do, it's good to know where to find the right one. FindLaw can put you in touch with a small business attorney in your area to help answer your questions. Learn more with a free case review.

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Eureka Utah

What Is Business Law?

 

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Do I Need a Business Lawyer?

As a business owner, you face many decisions when it comes to starting, running, and growing your business.

This article is designed to explain your options and help you decide the correct business type for your business. business-types

It explains the advantages and disadvantages of the main business types, including Sole Proprietorship, Partnership, Limited Liability Company, C Corporation, as well as S Corporation.

After I clearly explain each business type in detail and go over the advantages and disadvantages of each, I will explain how you can form your own entity so you can get started with your business and help protect yourself from liability.

Thank you for going on this journey with me. If you have any questions whatsoever, I encourage you to post questions down below in the comment section.

Sole Proprietorship

The sole proprietorship is the simplest business form and is not a legal entity. Sole proprietorship is the easiest type of business to establish which means that there’s no state filing required.

It is simply an enterprise owned and operated by an individual. By default, once you start selling goods or services, you have created a sole proprietorship.

So there’s no actual filing requirements and you simply report your business’s earnings on your personal taxes.

sole proprietorship is not legally separate from its owner and it offers no personal liability protection. The law does not distinguish between the owner’s personal assets and the business’s obligations.

In fact, a sole proprietor’s assets can be and often are used to satisfy the debts and liabilities of the business. In other words, if your business gets sued, your personal assets (such as your house, car, or any other properties you own) may also be in risk.

Accidents happen, and businesses end all the time. Such circumstances may quickly become a nightmare for a business owner who operates as a sole proprietor.

A sole proprietorship can operate under the name of its owner or it can do business under a fictitious name, such as Benjamin's Hair Shop. The fictitious name is simply a trade name--it does not create a legal entity separate from the sole proprietor owner.

The sole proprietorship is a popular business form due to its simplicity, ease of setup, and nominal cost. A sole proprietor need only register his or her name and secure local licenses, and the sole proprietor is ready for business.

The owner of a sole proprietorship typically signs contracts in his or her own name, because the sole proprietorship has no separate identity under the law. The sole proprietor owner will typically have customers write checks in the owner's name, even if the business uses a fictitious name. Sole proprietor owners can, and often do, commingle personal and business property and funds, something that partnerships, LLCs and corporations cannot do.

Sole proprietorships often have their bank accounts in the name of the owner. Sole proprietors need not observe formalities such as voting and meetings associated with the more complex business forms.

Sole proprietorships can bring lawsuits (and can be sued) using the name of the sole proprietor owner. Many businesses begin as sole proprietorships and graduate to more complex business forms as the business develops.

Because a sole proprietorship is indistinguishable from its owner, sole proprietorship taxation is actually easy. The income earned by a sole proprietorship is income earned by its owner.

A sole proprietor reports the sole proprietorship income and losses and expenses by filling out and filing a Schedule C, along with the standard Form 1040. Your profits and losses are first recorded on a tax form called Schedule C, which is filed along with your 1040. Then the "bottom-line amount" from Schedule C is transferred to your personal tax return.

This aspect is attractive because business losses you suffer may offset income earned from other sources.

As a sole proprietor, you must also file an IRS tax Schedule SE with Form 1040. You use Schedule SE to calculate how much self-employment tax you owe. You need not pay unemployment tax on yourself, although you must pay unemployment tax on any employees of the business. Of course, you won't enjoy unemployment benefits should the business suffer.

Advantages of Sole Proprietorship

Instant, easy & inexpensive No state paperwork is required for creation No separate tax filing is required -- profits or losses are reported on the owner’s tax return The owner may freely mix business and personal assets A sole proprietor need not pay unemployment tax on himself or herself (but must pay employee unemployment tax) Few, if any, ongoing formalities

Disadvantages of Sole Proprietorship The owner is subject to unlimited personal liability for business debts, losses and liabilities Obtaining capital, such as a bank loan, can be more difficult -- lenders often require a more formal entity structure Sole proprietorships rarely survive an owner’s death or incapacity, so they do not retain value Sole proprietorships by definition can only have one owner A distinct disadvantage, however, is that the owner of a sole proprietorship remains personally liable for all the business's debts.

So, if a sole proprietor business runs into financial trouble, creditors can bring lawsuits against the business owner. If such suits are successful, the owner will have to pay the business debts with his or her own money.

Let's examine this more closely because the potential liability can be alarming. Assume that a sole proprietor borrows money to operate but the business loses its major customer, goes out of business, and is unable to repay the loan. The sole proprietor is liable for the amount of the loan, which can potentially consume all her personal assets.

Imagine an even worse scenario: The sole proprietor is involved in a business-related accident in which someone is injured or killed. The resulting negligence case can be brought against the sole proprietor owner and against her personal assets, such as her bank account, her retirement accounts, and even her home.

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Mona Utah business law office

 

Mona Utah

Business Lawyer: Yes, You Do Need to Hire One Immediately

 

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Among the countless worries for entrepreneurs who are starting or are already running a small business is the question of whether they need a business lawyer. The perception is that attorneys charge high rates and many small businesses don't have much, if any, extra capital with which to pay lawyers. As a result, most small business owners only hire an attorney experienced with business matters when confronted with a serious legal problem (e.g., you're sued by a customer). However, legal help is a cost of doing business that often saves you money and helps your business in the long run. While you certainly don't need an attorney for every step of running your business, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of the cure. This article will explain when you can cover legal issues on your own or with minimal attorney assistance and when you will definitely need a business lawyer. Issues You Can Handle on Your Own There are certain matters that are fairly straightforward and/or not unduly difficult to learn and therefore do not require the services of an attorney who charges at least $200 per hour. There are enough expenses associated with running a business, why not save yourself a load of money and do it yourself if you can? The following is a list of some tasks that business owners should consider taking on themselves (with the aid of self-help resources, online and in print): Writing a business plan Researching and picking a name for your business (previously trademarked business names can be researched online) Reserving a domain name for your website Creating a legal partnership agreement, limited liability company (LLC) operating agreement, or shareholder's agreement (see Choosing a Legal Structure) Applying for an employer identification number (EIN), which you will need for employee tax purposes Applying for any licenses and permits the business requires Interviewing and hiring employees (there are federal and state anti-discrimination laws which regulate the hiring of employees) Submitting necessary IRS forms Documenting LLC meetings Hiring independent contractors and contracting with vendors Creating contracts for use with customers or clients Creating a buy-sell agreement with partners Updating any partnership, LLC, or shareholder's agreements under which you are currently operating Handling audits initiated by the IRS The above is not an exhaustive list of legal tasks which small business owners can do on their own. It should be stated that if your business is well-funded or you feel that you need the assistance of an attorney, you can always retain a lawyer to help you with everything listed above.

Issues Where You Will Need a Business Lawyer

Most of the issues outlined above can be handled by any intelligent business owner (if you can run a business, you can certainly fill out IRS forms or fill in boilerplate business forms). There are times, however, when a business faces issues that are too complex, too time consuming, or fraught with liability issues. At that point,the wisest move is to retain a business lawyer.

A few examples include:

Former, current, or prospective employees suing on the grounds of discrimination in hiring, firing, or hostile work environment Local, state, or federal government entities filing complaints or investigating your business for violation of any laws. You want to make a "special allocation" of profits and losses or you want to contribute appreciated property to your partnership or LLC agreement An environmental issue arises and your business is involved (even if your business didn't cause the environmental problem, you may be penalized) Negotiating for the sale or your company or for the acquisition of another company or its assets

An Ounce of Prevention

While you certainly need to retain an attorney for the serious issues above, your emphasis should be placed on preventing such occurrences in the first place. Prevention does not necessarily involve hiring an attorney, though consulting with one wouldn't hurt. By the time you or your business is sued, the preventable damage has been done and the only question that remains is how much you'll be paying in attorney's fees, court fees, and damages.

For example, by the time a prospective employee files a lawsuit claiming gender discrimination based in part upon questions posed at the job interview, all you can do is hire an attorney to defend the lawsuit. If, on the other hand, you had done your own research on anti-discrimination laws, or you had consulted an attorney beforehand, you would have known not to inquire as to whether the applicant was pregnant or planned on becoming pregnant. The small effort at the beginning of the process would save you an enormous headache later.

To prevent unnecessary attorney costs at the inception of your business as well as tremendous costs after a lawsuit has been filed, you might consider a consultation arrangement with an attorney. Such an arrangement would entail you doing most of the legwork of research and the attorney providing legal review or guidance.

For example, you might use self help and online sources to create a contract with a vendor and ask an attorney to simply review and offer suggestions. Or from the previous example, you might research types of questions to ask during an interview and then send the list to an attorney for his or her approval. This way, you prevent the potential headache later and the cost to you is minimal because you've already done most of the work and the attorney simply reviews the document.

Free Case Review for Your Business Needs Call 1-800-564-2707 today.

You won't need a lawyer for each and every legal issue that comes up in your business. But when you do, it's good to know where to find the right one. FindLaw can put you in touch with a small business attorney in your area to help answer your questions. Learn more with a free case review.

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Huntsville Utah corporate counsel

 

Huntsville Utah

Business Attorney

 

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No matter what my personal role in a business transaction-as business owner, supplier, customer, facilitator, or as an attorney for one of the parties-everyone has the same reaction to the lawyer's participation: "Oh, no....now nothing is going to get done....here come the lawyers!"Before I became an attorney, I felt the same way. The presence of them seemed to automatically up the tension and the probability that whatever we wanted to get accomplished just wasn't going to happen (or if it was, with a tremendous amount of difficulty). Why is this? Why does everyone dread a lawyer's participation in a business transaction, and what can be done, if anything, to change that?I believe the first part of the question may be answered, on one hand, by the simple fact that most people consider them to be a necessary evil. You don't call one because you want to, you call one because you need to. The feeling that you need to do it could stem from a variety of reasons-fear that the other side will take advantage of you, a feeling that you don't understand the situation as well as you would like, apprehension of what will happen if you don't have someone to stand by your side, that the other side, at the very least, will perceive you to be vulnerable without their presence, or just simply because they have a level of understanding and expertise about the issue which you don't possess.On the other hand, I also believe that people dread the lawyer's participation due to a misperception about the lawyer's role. Unfortunately, lawyers themselves also hold this misperception much of the time, which only aggravates the situation.So what is this misperception?In a business transaction, like most other attorney-client relationships, their job should be to advise the client-you. Generally, the purpose of hiring one is to minimize the risks and maximize the advantages to you, the client, as much as possible. What often happens, though, is that the lawyer and/or the client lose sight of the business transaction at hand. No one would argue that there are risks inherent in every business deal. The risks for you are different from the risks to the other side. The question is, how much risk are you willing to assume in order to accomplish your goal of completing this business transaction?When the focus shifts strictly to minimizing the risks, the ultimate result is often that that the other party no longer finds the business deal attractive, or feels that they just cannot work with you. When this happens, many businesspersons have lost sight of the goal because they become focused on allocating liability to the other side. When this happens, it often causes a breakdown in relationships between the parties-and most of the time, to the parties' detriment, not to their advantage.In the end, it is important to remember at all times that you are, ultimately, the decision maker, and your lawyer is the one who gives you advice and options, which you may choose to take, or not (because this is your business and you have to be the one ultimately responsible for making the business decisions). One of the first decisions you need to make is about what type of lawyer you want to work with. Everyone wants someone who will be looking out for their interests, but what does that mean? Does it really mean you hire someone who helps alienate your valuable business associates because they are so busy "protecting your interests" that they lose sight of what you are trying to accomplish? Or does it mean that you find someone that understands the needs of the small business person, including the real possibility that you may have to accept a certain level of risk in order to get things done? Although there are many attorneys who practice business law, most attorneys are not businesspersons in the traditional sense. There is a wide difference between understanding negotiation and litigation. It is important, therefore, that whoever you hire, they can fully explain to you, in plain language, what the risks are and the potential outcome(s) of your decisions from a legal standpoint-and that you take the advice and make decisions accordingly.

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Elberta Utah business lawyer near me

 

Elberta Utah

What Is Business Law?

 

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Are you starting a business? Hiring or firing top-level employees? Signing a deal or contract?Buying or merging with another company?When do you exactly need a business attorney?Before hiring a business attorney, you might want to ask your prospect these questions:o How long he has been practicing law?o What is his area of specialty?o Has he represented a similar company before?o Who are the other lawyers and paralegal who will work with him in the firm?o How much are the legal fees and the expenses that will be charged?o Are the sample legal forms, agreements and policies that you can see?o How many corporations has he incorporated?o Has he any experience in handling employment matters?o Has he any experience in dealing with tax issues?o Has he any business advice to keep you safe from lawsuits?When serious legal problems arise, you will need the skills and experience of a business lawyer. Here are a few situations when the services of a business lawyer are needed:o In special allocation meeting - This is the time when you and your business partner decide to set aside profits and losses in your partnership agreemento When either one of you in the partnership wants to donate or contribute an appreciated property to the partnershipo When an employee or former associate threatens to sue your companyIn addition, when business is running, you will need the services of a lawyer to do the following tasks:o Prepare written agreements for hiring of contractors and consultantso Create documents for clients and customerso Document business meetings and actionso Call and hold corporate meetings, and prepare its minuteso Draft buy-sell agreements with business partnerso Update and make necessary changes in business agreementso Handle tax auditGenerally, what a business attorney can do is protect your business from resource-draining lawsuits and litigation. A lawyer can always offer measures to avoid the potential danger of frivolous lawsuits. Here is some of it:o Protect personal assets by separating personal property from business assetso Give attention to details such posting of warning signs and labels on productso Post store policies in public areas such as dressing rooms, in company literature on the website and even in store receiptso Ensure potential hazards are cleared which include posting of warning signs to avoid accidentso Make a record of customer phone requests, suggestions and complaintso Attend to customer needso Supervise staff training on policies and guidelineso Make insurance coverage for the company against accidents, injuries, theft, and liability.Business attorneys are vital to business and finding the one who will truly represent your company is never easy. After selecting the lawyer that you need, the next thing to do is to find out information about his background and experience.Former colleagues and clients can provide you with a wealth of information about a lawyer's background and credentials. You can also check his membership in the state bar association to confirm his legal personality.For more information about the most relevant business law applicable to your particular case, request the guidance of business law attorneys services.

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Dugway Utah business lawyers

 

Dugway Utah

Lawyer for Starting a Business

 

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Do I Need an LLC (limited liability company)

Slowly becoming more as a standard for businesses, a Limited Liability Company (or LLC) is a hybrid business form which combines the liability protection of a corporation with the tax treatment and ease of administration of a partnership.

The LLC is America’s newest form of business organization and is the most popular form of business.

The "owners" of an LLC are referred to as "members." Depending on the state, the members can consist of a single person, two or more people, corporations or other LLCs.

Unlike shareholders in a corporation, LLCs are not taxed as a separate business entity. Instead, all profits and losses are "passed through" the business to each member of the LLC. LLC members report profits and losses on their personal federal tax returns, just like the owners of a partnership would.

In other words, in the eyes of the government, an LLC is not a separate tax entity, so the business itself is not taxed. Instead, all federal income taxes are passed on to the LLC's members and are paid through their personal income tax. While the federal government does not tax income on an LLC, some states do, so make sure to check with your state's income tax agency.

Since the federal government does not recognize LLC as a business entity for taxation purposes, all LLCs must file as a corporation, partnership, or sole proprietorship tax return.

LLCs that are not automatically classified as a corporation can choose their business entity classification. To elect a classification, an LLC must file Form 8832. This form is also used if an LLC wishes to change its classification status.

Disadvantages of Limited Liability Company (LLC)

More expensive to form than sole proprietorships and general partnerships.

Ownership is typically harder to transfer than with a corporation.

Limited Life - In many states, when a member leaves an LLC, the business is dissolved and the members must fulfill all remaining legal and business obligations to close the business. The remaining members can decide if they want to start a new LLC or part ways. However, you can include provisions in your operating agreement to prolong the life of the LLC if a member decides to leave the business.

Also, because the LLC is a newer business type, there is not as much case law to rely on for determining precedent.

When you need an LLC lawyer call 1-800-564-2707. lawyer small business

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Goshen Utah commerical law attorney

 

Goshen Utah

Business Lawyer: Yes, You Do Need to Hire One Immediately

 

lawyer for business lawsuits

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Have you ever wondered about what a small business attorney is? Well, if you have, then welcome! A small business attorney is a person that went through years of schooling to get his or her degree in business to be able to learn and grow as a businessperson.Small business attorneys have all sorts of duties. They find information about how to start a corporation, partnership, or sole proprietorship, franchises, general business law, and taxation. They can study their processes and regulations in order to assist people in a more explainable manner. Small business attorneys give individuals the tools and advice in order to help their business grow. With that being said, if you want to start your own business, think about creating a partnership. When creating a partnership a person can find the assistance they need from a small business attorney and the attorney can help out with the important filings that you need for a small business.There are of course other orders that have to be met by the state of California in order for businesses to be accepted. Among them are that corporations and companies file a form called a "statement of information". Your small business attorney can help you out by explaining to you which forms you need to use in order to file your papers. The attorney may also tell you that you can fill out the papers at the secretary's main website.Small business lawyers concentrate on many factors that have to do with businesses. They know about sole proprietorships, partnerships, LLC'S, corporations, nonprofit corporations, business contracts, hiring workers, and risk management for your business. Small business attorneys deal with and cover many of these situations no matter what type of company it is.A small business is considered small based on certain standards that have to do with various industries in relation to the state of the economy. The laws and the rules that your business has to follow depend on each state, the legal formation of your business, and the nature of the product and service your company offers to people. Since the laws change year after year, there is no way of keeping a checklist as it may have old laws and regulations from the past.That is why if you are planning on starting a small business of your own it is best if you obtain a small business lawyer in order to have a clear sense and not fall into any serious business trouble that you may have if you do it on your own. A small business lawyer does not only give you advice and counsel about the laws that have to do with owning a small business but they also represent you when any legal problems occur.You have probably heard, in the past, about the many different types of insurance that exist today. But have you ever heard of a process called insurance claims? An insurance claim is a request made to an insurance company. It can be any type of insurance but, mainly, it is a person asking for payment based on the regulations of the insurance policy. In other words, insurance claims are then reviewed by the company for their acceptance and then once that is finished it is finally paid to the insured or the requestor.Insurance can cover everything from death benefits on life insurance policies to routine health tests for your well being at your local doctor. On the other hand, claims are filed by third parties for the insured person. There are many types of insurance available, for example, health insurance, disability, auto, life, home, and car accident.The main function of business law is to cover all laws that govern any business and commercial transactions. It is also thought of as being a civil law that revolves around both private law and public law. Within business law there is something called commercial law, which has two elements; a principal and an agent. This mainly has to do with things like carriage by land and sea, merchant shipping, fire, life, insurance accident, bills of exchange and partnership.Other countries have made their own civil codes that communicate statements of their own commercial law. In the United States, commercial law is part of the United States Congress and its power to control interstate commerce. A lot has been taken care of in order to better the unity of commercial law in the United States.

it's time to higher the big guns - you need a 5-star rated business attorney call 1-800-564-2707. lawyer for business lawsuits

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