Woodruff Utah contract attorney

 

Woodruff Utah

General Counsel

 

lawyer for small business

Previous Article    Home    Utah Home

What Does A Small Business Lawyer Do

A small business lawyer works with individuals who own small businesses. The lawyer may help them form their business and incorporate their company when they’re just getting starting.

Later, the business owner may turn to the lawyer to help with employment issues and understanding laws and policies that pertain to their business.

The truth is, a small business lawyer can handle anything that the small business owner would need in terms of the law, business formation, hiring and firing employees, lawsuits, and much more.

What Makes A Good Business Lawyer

A good business lawyer is someone who is experienced and knowledgeable in their field. They’ve worked with many businesses and entrepreneurs and have created a smooth process to help business owners get just what they need.

We are a good and reputable business lawyer because we truly care about our clients. We put you first and are here to answer any questions you may have along the way. We’ve worked with countless business owners and entrepreneurs and always deliver on what we promise.

What To Ask A Business Lawyer

When you are meeting your business lawyer the first time, you may have some questions for them. Some of them may include:

Are you licensed to practice law? How many years have you been practicing law? What results do you get for your clients? Do you have any personal recommendations I can check on? What can I expect when working with you? Do you have any hidden fees I should know about? What’s the timeline for this? After your initial consultation, you may have some other questions as you continue to make decisions about your business.

Some of these may be what type of business entity should I choose (LLC or S-Corp), what’s the advantages of each, and how do I make my business compliant with all laws?

Your specific questions will change as you move forward in the process, depending on what you’re getting help for. It’s best to write down any questions you have when you think of them and then ask your lawyer the next time you meet.

When Would I Use A Business Lawyer

You may hire a business lawyer when you’re forming your business and trying to decide how you should incorporate it. You may want a business lawyer to help you file all the necessary documentation and make sure that you’re compliant with all laws once you start your business.

Once your business has launched, you may want a business lawyer to help you create contracts for employees and any other hiring you may need to do. You’ll likely want a business lawyer to help you should you have the need to defend against a lawsuit or present one yourself.

There are so many reasons why you may need to use a business lawyer because a business lawyer has a wide range of skills and knowledge to help you in your day-to-day business operations as well as the unexpected.

If you’re questioning whether your issue needs the help of a business lawyer, call us at our Law Office for a free consultation. We will give you an honest assessment of your situation and help you determine the next steps to take. Simply dial 1-800-564-2707 today to get started.

 lawyer for business lawsuits

Next Article

lawyer for business lawsuits  http://www.businesslawyerutah.com/utah-4/

Fruitland Utah lawyer for business lawsuits

 

Fruitland Utah

Lawyer for Contract Review

 

business lawyer near me

Previous Article    Home    Utah Home

In one of his most famous and tautological quotes, President Warring G. Harding once observed that, "The business of America is business." He was right. No nation on earth has a stronger commitment to free enterprise than the United States. According to the Small Business Administration (SBA), there are nearly 30 million small companies in the U.S., which represents over 99 percent of all employer firms.Although it is invariably the corporations that make headlines when accused of wrongdoing, most business-related lawsuits are filed against small companies since there are so many of them. This specialized area of practice is called business litigation in the legal profession. Lawsuits that involve malpractice, contract law, and class action suits are the most common types of these cases.Who To CallEven though the law is supposed to be blind, companies of all sizes are often cast as villains when accused of wrongdoing. Whether the case is about food poisoning or a defective airbag, a firm must work fast to defend the company's good name. Failure to do so will almost inevitably result in a deluge of bad press, which will almost certainly hurt the bottom line.In any civil case, the complainant is the accuser, while the litigant is the accused, hence the term "business litigation." These accusers could be anyone, including a current or former employee, customer, client, or former partner. The most sophisticated cases litigation lawyers handle are class action suits.A lawyer that specializes in class action lawsuits must defend his client against a group of complainants that may include hundreds or even thousands of people. The outcome of these cases can alter the fortunes of any company, no matter how large they might be. The Master Tobacco Settlement, for example, was settled in 1998 for $206 billion over 25 years!What To ExpectWhether of the class action, contract, or malpractice variety, most of these cases are settled before they ever get to court. There are many reasons for this. First and most obviously, members of the firm that may or may not be responsible for any wrongdoing do not want their name tarnished in the press. As a result, they are often willing to settle cases they may not have been responsible for simply because it is cheaper and easier than going to trial. With that said, a good business litigation lawyer must be a skilled mediator, since that is often how these cases are resolved.Mediation Vs. ArbitrationAs a general rule, attorneys must negotiate in either arbitration or mediation hearings. The only difference between the two processes is that arbitration involves a legal judgment that is determined by an arbitration board, while mediation is simply an open negotiation between the two opposing sides.Settlements that are made in mediation often involve disputes where the complainant believes that they were unlawfully terminated. Because wrongful termination cases are so common, they seldom make the papers or the news, which is why they are often settled for a reasonable sum before they ever get to a judge.In any of the aforementioned situations, an experienced business lawyer may mean the difference between a crippling lawsuit and a legal victory.

When you need a highly recommended corporate attorney call 1-800-564-2707. business attorney

Next Article

business attorney  http://www.businesslawyerutah.com/utah-4/

Eden Utah general counsel

 

Eden Utah

Lawyer for Contract Review

 

attorney business law

Previous Article    Home    Utah Home

Sole Proprietorship - Simplest business structure, no filing requirements, but no personal liability protection

Partnership - Created automatically when 2 more persons engage in a business. By default, a business that begins with a verbal agreement or handshake is considered a general partnership. All partners share in both the day-to-day management and business profits. However, I highly advise using a written partnership agreement to form a partnership.

Limited Liability Company - A standard for most small businesses and online businesses. Features limited liability which means the owners of an LLC have no personal liability for the obligations of the LLC. An LLC is the entity of choice for a businesses seeking to flow through losses to its investors because an LLC offers complete liability protection to all its members.

C-Corporation - A corporation is an independent legal entity owned by its shareholders. This means that the corporation itself, not the shareholders that own it, is held legally liable for the actions and debts the business incurs. Also feature Corporate Tax Treatment meaning that corporations file taxes separately from their owners

S-Corporation - Pretty much the same as a C-Corporation + some tax benefits. Also, Profits and losses can pass through to your personal tax return. This means that the business is not taxed itself, only the shareholders are taxed.

When you need the best corporate lawyer call 1-800-564-2707. lawyer for business lawsuits

Next Article

lawyer for business lawsuits  http://www.businesslawyerutah.com/utah-4/

Willard Utah small business law

 

Willard Utah

Business Attorney

 

business lawyer near me

Previous Article    Home    Utah Home

Do I Need a Business Lawyer?

As a business owner, you face many decisions when it comes to starting, running, and growing your business.

This article is designed to explain your options and help you decide the correct business type for your business. business-types

It explains the advantages and disadvantages of the main business types, including Sole Proprietorship, Partnership, Limited Liability Company, C Corporation, as well as S Corporation.

After I clearly explain each business type in detail and go over the advantages and disadvantages of each, I will explain how you can form your own entity so you can get started with your business and help protect yourself from liability.

Thank you for going on this journey with me. If you have any questions whatsoever, I encourage you to post questions down below in the comment section.

Sole Proprietorship

The sole proprietorship is the simplest business form and is not a legal entity. Sole proprietorship is the easiest type of business to establish which means that there’s no state filing required.

It is simply an enterprise owned and operated by an individual. By default, once you start selling goods or services, you have created a sole proprietorship.

So there’s no actual filing requirements and you simply report your business’s earnings on your personal taxes.

sole proprietorship is not legally separate from its owner and it offers no personal liability protection. The law does not distinguish between the owner’s personal assets and the business’s obligations.

In fact, a sole proprietor’s assets can be and often are used to satisfy the debts and liabilities of the business. In other words, if your business gets sued, your personal assets (such as your house, car, or any other properties you own) may also be in risk.

Accidents happen, and businesses end all the time. Such circumstances may quickly become a nightmare for a business owner who operates as a sole proprietor.

A sole proprietorship can operate under the name of its owner or it can do business under a fictitious name, such as Benjamin's Hair Shop. The fictitious name is simply a trade name--it does not create a legal entity separate from the sole proprietor owner.

The sole proprietorship is a popular business form due to its simplicity, ease of setup, and nominal cost. A sole proprietor need only register his or her name and secure local licenses, and the sole proprietor is ready for business.

The owner of a sole proprietorship typically signs contracts in his or her own name, because the sole proprietorship has no separate identity under the law. The sole proprietor owner will typically have customers write checks in the owner's name, even if the business uses a fictitious name. Sole proprietor owners can, and often do, commingle personal and business property and funds, something that partnerships, LLCs and corporations cannot do.

Sole proprietorships often have their bank accounts in the name of the owner. Sole proprietors need not observe formalities such as voting and meetings associated with the more complex business forms.

Sole proprietorships can bring lawsuits (and can be sued) using the name of the sole proprietor owner. Many businesses begin as sole proprietorships and graduate to more complex business forms as the business develops.

Because a sole proprietorship is indistinguishable from its owner, sole proprietorship taxation is actually easy. The income earned by a sole proprietorship is income earned by its owner.

A sole proprietor reports the sole proprietorship income and losses and expenses by filling out and filing a Schedule C, along with the standard Form 1040. Your profits and losses are first recorded on a tax form called Schedule C, which is filed along with your 1040. Then the "bottom-line amount" from Schedule C is transferred to your personal tax return.

This aspect is attractive because business losses you suffer may offset income earned from other sources.

As a sole proprietor, you must also file an IRS tax Schedule SE with Form 1040. You use Schedule SE to calculate how much self-employment tax you owe. You need not pay unemployment tax on yourself, although you must pay unemployment tax on any employees of the business. Of course, you won't enjoy unemployment benefits should the business suffer.

Advantages of Sole Proprietorship

Instant, easy & inexpensive No state paperwork is required for creation No separate tax filing is required -- profits or losses are reported on the owner’s tax return The owner may freely mix business and personal assets A sole proprietor need not pay unemployment tax on himself or herself (but must pay employee unemployment tax) Few, if any, ongoing formalities

Disadvantages of Sole Proprietorship The owner is subject to unlimited personal liability for business debts, losses and liabilities Obtaining capital, such as a bank loan, can be more difficult -- lenders often require a more formal entity structure Sole proprietorships rarely survive an owner’s death or incapacity, so they do not retain value Sole proprietorships by definition can only have one owner A distinct disadvantage, however, is that the owner of a sole proprietorship remains personally liable for all the business's debts.

So, if a sole proprietor business runs into financial trouble, creditors can bring lawsuits against the business owner. If such suits are successful, the owner will have to pay the business debts with his or her own money.

Let's examine this more closely because the potential liability can be alarming. Assume that a sole proprietor borrows money to operate but the business loses its major customer, goes out of business, and is unable to repay the loan. The sole proprietor is liable for the amount of the loan, which can potentially consume all her personal assets.

Imagine an even worse scenario: The sole proprietor is involved in a business-related accident in which someone is injured or killed. The resulting negligence case can be brought against the sole proprietor owner and against her personal assets, such as her bank account, her retirement accounts, and even her home.

When you need the best lawyer call 1-800-564-2707. general outside counsel

Next Article

general outside counsel  http://www.businesslawyerutah.com/utah-4/

Eureka Utah business lawyer consultation

 

Eureka Utah

Top Rated Business Lawyer

 

contract attorney

Previous Article    Home    Utah Home

Sole Proprietorship - Simplest business structure, no filing requirements, but no personal liability protection

Partnership - Created automatically when 2 more persons engage in a business. By default, a business that begins with a verbal agreement or handshake is considered a general partnership. All partners share in both the day-to-day management and business profits. However, I highly advise using a written partnership agreement to form a partnership.

Limited Liability Company - A standard for most small businesses and online businesses. Features limited liability which means the owners of an LLC have no personal liability for the obligations of the LLC. An LLC is the entity of choice for a businesses seeking to flow through losses to its investors because an LLC offers complete liability protection to all its members.

C-Corporation - A corporation is an independent legal entity owned by its shareholders. This means that the corporation itself, not the shareholders that own it, is held legally liable for the actions and debts the business incurs. Also feature Corporate Tax Treatment meaning that corporations file taxes separately from their owners

S-Corporation - Pretty much the same as a C-Corporation + some tax benefits. Also, Profits and losses can pass through to your personal tax return. This means that the business is not taxed itself, only the shareholders are taxed.

When you need the best corporate lawyer call 1-800-564-2707. legal advice for business

Next Article

legal advice for business  http://www.businesslawyerutah.com/utah-4/

Mona Utah business law office

 

Mona Utah

Contract Business Attorney

 

attorney business law

Previous Article    Home    Utah Home

The "C" Corporation

C-Corporation

A corporation is the most common business structure. A corporation is an independent legal entity owned by its shareholders.

This means that the corporation itself, not the shareholders that own it, is held legally liable for the actions and debts the business incurs.

Corporations are more complex than other business structures because they tend to have costly administrative fees and complex tax and legal requirements. Because of these issues, corporations are generally suggested for established, larger companies with multiple employees.

For businesses in that position, corporations offer the ability to sell ownership shares in the business through stock offerings. “Going public” through an initial public offering (IPO) is a major selling point in attracting investment capital and high quality employees.

A corporation’s shareholders, directors, and officers must observe particular formalities in a corporation’s operation and administration.

For example, management decisions must often be made by formal vote and recorded in corporate minutes. Director and shareholder meetings must be properly noticed and documented.

Finally, corporations must meet annual reporting requirements and pay ongoing fees in their state of incorporation and in states where they are registered to transact business.

Taxation is a significant consideration when choosing a business type, and a C corporation is taxed as a separate legal entity (which means no pass-through taxation like a partnership). A business tax return is filed and taxes are paid on the corporation’s profits.

If the corporation distributes profits to the shareholders in the form of dividends, shareholders pay income tax on those distributions. This creates a double taxation of corporate profits.

As with any business type that offers liability protection to owners, a corporation must be created at the state level. Articles of Incorporation (sometimes called a Certificate of Incorporation) in the appropriate state must be filed and filing fees paid.

When you need the best corporate lawyer call 1-800-564-2707. top business attorney

Next Article

top business attorney  http://www.businesslawyerutah.com/utah-4/

Huntsville Utah corporate counsel

 

Huntsville Utah

Business Attorneys - What Is Their Role When Buying And Selling A Business?

 

contract attorney

Previous Article    Home    Utah Home

I get asked this question all of the time. Mainly, this question comes from people I run into that own and operate a small business and have always done things for themselves. The business may have a few employees, own some assets and is quite profitable. When speaking with them, I always hear "I don't really have any legal problems so why do I need a lawyer? Business is good and my employees love me." Well, when I hear this, I know what I am getting into.The first thing I ask these people is: how is your business structured? LLC? Corporation? Once we determine that answer, the next questions become: Do you have an operating agreement if you are an LLC or by-laws if you are a corporation? Do you have annual meeting minutes? Seven out of ten times people respond "no" to these questions. This is why they need a business lawyer. If they are not following corporate formalities and organizational protocols and someone would sue the company, the chance of that plaintiff piercing the corporate veil and attacking the owner's personal assets increases exponentially.Another question I ask is: do you have written contracts for the work you perform and the business dealing you are involved in? About 4 out of 10 say no. Again, this is why they need a business lawyer. The handshake agreement doesn't work in today's society. Everything should be in writing, not because you can trust no one, it is because you need to protect your rights. If they don't have contracts they use or have written them themselves, you can bet that they will spend insane amounts of money to settle disputes that could have been prevented by working with a business lawyer from the start.Lastly, I usually ask them if they understand the various federal and state employment laws that govern the employer-employee relationship. Most respond with "Pennsylvania is an employee at will state and I can fire anyone at anytime." This is what I call a ticking time bomb. Yes, it is true that Pennsylvania recognizes employment at will; however, there are various laws that give employees protection from discrimination, unfair treatment, unfair wages, etc. Most of the time these business owners have no idea what they don't know and end up doing something that costs them ten of thousands of dollars to settle. This is why they need a business lawyer.So as you can see, there are many reasons to work with a business lawyer when you own a business from the start. People improperly assume that the only time they will need a lawyer is in the event that they get sued. However, a good business lawyer will help you run your business in a way that limits the reasons for which you could be sued at a fraction of the cost it will take to litigate and resolve a dispute down the road.

When you need a business trial attorney call 1-800-564-2707. lawyer for financial planner

Next Article

lawyer for financial planner  http://www.businesslawyerutah.com/utah-4/

Elberta Utah business lawyer near me

 

Elberta Utah

What Is A Business Litigation Lawyer?

 

business lawyer near me

Previous Article    Home    Utah Home

Sole Proprietorship - Simplest business structure, no filing requirements, but no personal liability protection

Partnership - Created automatically when 2 more persons engage in a business. By default, a business that begins with a verbal agreement or handshake is considered a general partnership. All partners share in both the day-to-day management and business profits. However, I highly advise using a written partnership agreement to form a partnership.

Limited Liability Company - A standard for most small businesses and online businesses. Features limited liability which means the owners of an LLC have no personal liability for the obligations of the LLC. An LLC is the entity of choice for a businesses seeking to flow through losses to its investors because an LLC offers complete liability protection to all its members.

C-Corporation - A corporation is an independent legal entity owned by its shareholders. This means that the corporation itself, not the shareholders that own it, is held legally liable for the actions and debts the business incurs. Also feature Corporate Tax Treatment meaning that corporations file taxes separately from their owners

S-Corporation - Pretty much the same as a C-Corporation + some tax benefits. Also, Profits and losses can pass through to your personal tax return. This means that the business is not taxed itself, only the shareholders are taxed.

When you need the best corporate lawyer call 1-800-564-2707. lawyer for small business

Next Article

lawyer for small business  http://www.businesslawyerutah.com/utah-4/

Dugway Utah business lawyers

 

Dugway Utah

Top Rated Business Lawyer

 

local business attorneys

Previous Article    Home    Utah Home

What is a Business Lawyer and Why Do I need one?

A business lawyer is an attorney who focuses his or her legal practice on issues that affect businesses, such as starting a business, business contracts, taxation, and intellectual property.

Business lawyers typically work with business owners and entrepreneurs start and grow their business.

Types of Business Lawyers

Business lawyers who practice law can be divided into two general categories: transactional business lawyers who focus on contractual work and litigation business lawyers who focus on trial work.

Transactional business lawyers frequently spend the better part of their day talking with clients, negotiating contracts with lawyers representing other companies, and drafting contracts and other documents, such as independent contractor agreements, physician employment contracts, and the like.

Most of transactional business lawyer’s time is spent in their offices and with clients, never in the courtroom. Transactions lawyers also give clients advice on regulatory issues as well as prepare documents required by regulatory agencies, such as the the IRS.

Business trial lawyers focus on disputes between businesses that end up in court. They act just as any civil trial lawyer does, except that they litigate business issues, such as breach of a contract, rather than criminal law or personal injury.

Business trial lawyers’ days are often filled with meeting clients, conducting depositions, drafting legal documents like motions and pleadings, and appearing in court for trial, motion hearings, or arbitrations (which are trials but conducted in front of a panel of lawyers or an independent hearings officer).

What Does a Business Lawyers Do

A business lawyer can help you make decisions for your business regarding a wide variety of areas including business formations, contract negotiations, employment and labor laws, and litigation.

Basically, a business lawyer can help you form and incorporate your business, be sure that it’s legal and compliant as it grows, and help you with anything that should come up in the form of contracts, litigation, and hiring individuals as you grow.

How Can A Business Lawyer Help a Business?

A business lawyer can help a business at any stage, from the beginning and on.

In the beginning stages of a business, you may want a business lawyer to advise you about what type of business you should form and help you look at the unique advantages and disadvantages of each.

Once you decide which type of business to form, your business lawyer will file the required papers to your state, city, and county as applicable to make sure your business is legal and compliant.

Once your business is formed, a business lawyer can help you with contracts, hiring help, and any litigation issues that may arise.

If you have questions concerning how a business lawyer can help you, don’t hesitate to contact me Sam Mollaei, Esq., Business Lawyer, at sam@mollaeilaw.com or at (818) 925-0002 about my services.

How Do I Get A Business Lawyer?

Once you decide to hire a business lawyer, you should contact them to discuss their services and what you’re looking for. Many offer a free consultation, which is helpful session to learn more about the lawyer and how they work.

You can set up a free consultation with top business attorneys today by calling 1-800-564-2707. We encourage you to ask any questions you may have at that time to help you make a hiring decision.

How Much Does a Business Lawyer Cost

A business lawyer cost depends on the lawyer -- you can typically expect a lawyer to charge flat-rate or hourly. Typically, you'd want to work with a business lawyer that charges a flat-hour fee upfront.

A business lawyer usually bills in a flat-rate or hourly, depending on the specifications of the work.

A fixed or flat fee is simply a pre-arranged total fee that is paid upfront to complete all work required for a particular legal matter.

On your free consultation call, you can ask our attorneys how much a service costs upfront before the service starts. I can give you a quote ahead of time that outlines the charges and any fees you need to be aware of before you sign any contract.

The free consultation call is also helpful to learn about how the lawyer charges and you can ask for a typical fee range so you can plan ahead and determine how much to budget for in order to hire your business lawyer.

How To Find Business Lawyer We are your best resource for finding an affordable and knowledgeable business lawyer to help you with your business.

We specialize in business law working with business owners and entrepreneurs.

How To Get a Business Lawyer

When you’re ready to hire a business attorney for your business law needs, we have several ways you can get the process started.

One option is to call us directly at 1-800-564-2707 to setup your free consultation and from there you can hire us for your legal needs.

Should I Use A Business Lawyer

That depends on what you are trying to achieve. There are some things you may feel comfortable tackling on your own such as writing a business plan or choosing a name for your business. On the other hand, there are some matters that are best handled with the help of a lawyer.

Some of the issues that you should hire a business lawyer for are making sure your business is compliant with all state, city, and county laws around owning and operating a business, dealing with any lawsuits, and negotiating the sale of your company or purchase of another company.

The above list are just a few examples and are certainly not an exhaustive list. If you have question whether you should hire a lawyer to help you, you probably should go ahead and hire one.

 lawyer small business

Next Article

lawyer small business  http://www.businesslawyerutah.com/utah-4/

Goshen Utah commerical law attorney

 

Goshen Utah

Corporate Lawyer

 

lawyer for business lawsuits

Previous Article    Home    Utah Home

Most states require that an entity doing business within their borders designate and maintain a Registered Agent. The Registered Agent can be an individual or company hired to receive Service of Process on behalf of the business. However, not all entities are registered in all states, not all are active and some do business under as many as 40 plus entity names. It is the lawyer's responsibility to find out which entity name they are serving and who the Registered Agent is. If the information is wrong, the lawsuit will be delayed. To find the necessary information, the attorney's staff should be intimately familiar with Secretary of State websites.Each Secretary of State website lists an entity as either "Active" or "Inactive." "Active" means the entity is in good standing and has paid their yearly fee while "Inactive" means they have not, In fact, "Inactive" may indicate that the entity is no longer in business or meet the qualification so the Five-year rule.The most perplexing error may be in determining which entity name is the correct one. For example, an entity may be doing business under both Talbott, Inc. and Talbott, Corp. If a lawsuit is submitted just to "Talbott," it will be returned.The larger Registered Agent companies have offices in nearly every state. They collectively receive thousands of lawsuits a week that generate huge piles of work. Of those, several hundred are returned at the Registered Agent's expense for various reasons. Attorney's who repeatedly make the same errors soon stand out in the Service of Process Specialist's mind and their lawsuits often go to the bottom of the pile. There is no time limit on returns, the Registered Agent makes no money and it may be as much at a week or two before the returns are written up and sent out.The answer is simple. A well informed staff that understands the Registered Agent process can virtually eliminate these and many other costly mistakes.

When you need a top business lawyer call 1-800-564-2707. lawyer for business lawsuits

Next Article

lawyer for business lawsuits  http://www.businesslawyerutah.com/utah-4/